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November 07, 2005, 12:32:30 PM
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121  Course Assignments / WEEK FIVE / Re: Death and Absence in Joyce on: September 13, 2005, 05:29:19 AM
JJ's sense of humor, robust & hilarious in places, seems incredibly subtle in others.
I think EXILES, if properly performed, wd become a screwball comedy
worthy of Cary Grant...
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122  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: Occupation, dublin and FW on: September 11, 2005, 11:42:45 AM
paragraph 1

riverrun  > river Anna Liffey flows thru Dublin

pasr Eve nd Adam's  > Liffey passes church of Adam & Eve at Merchant's Quay

Howth Castle > built 1170 by Norman invader sir Trisram Armory de St Lawrence

paragraph 2

Sir Tristram ...Armorica...laurens > builder of Howth Castle

isthhmus > hill of Howth at north of istmus of Sutton

mishe mishe...tauf tauf > stuttering > Parnell stuttered

peatrick > St Paricl's Cathedral

kiscad >cadet [younger rival]

butended...isaac > Isaac Butt replaced by Parnell as leader of Home Rule party

malt...Jhem of Shen > Jameson's whiskey

paragraph 3

Finnegan > irish ballad/Finnnegan pronounced dead but rises again
> Finn again

knock out in park > Castle Knock east of Phoenix park

livvy > Anna liffey

paragraph 4

wils gen wants > Vico & Marx on class war

[wars/battle/weapons thickly clustered in this paragraph]

cashels aired and ventilated > Cashel cathedral burned by Silken Thomas

paragraph 7

butt...under ...bidge  >  Butt Bridge, last bridge Liffey flows under
before entering Dublin Bay
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123  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: Gaylick renessisterdance on: September 09, 2005, 04:43:30 PM
Also sprach acryllic
'in the bogiing wuz the woid'


JJ has, somewhere in part III, "Inn the buggining is the woid,
in the muddle is the soundance, then you're in the
unbewised again."
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124  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / the shining seven on: September 09, 2005, 04:34:23 PM
--The shining seven W.B. calls them.

As you've looked at the first 7 paragraphs thru four different grids,
do you think any grid seems more true or more relevant
than any or all of the others?

Do you see any application of this exercize to daily life or science?
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125  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: FW: Hostory and Resistance on: September 08, 2005, 04:52:15 PM
A lot of Joyce's friends got killed in the Easter Rising of 1916
Statues of some of them adorn Stephen's Green.

Easter chosen for the Rising by Padaic Pearse
for poetic/mythic resonance.

"phall as you will, rise you must"
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126  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: epiphany & ideogram on: September 08, 2005, 04:41:10 PM
"If I can find my gingko baloba,
it'll help me remember
where I left my
viagara."
--Harrison  Ford in HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE
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127  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: The name Finnegan/Finn/Nora on: September 08, 2005, 04:33:26 PM
Finnegan, Nora and Shaun the Post all appear as
charcters in Arrah na Pogue ['nora of the kiss']
by Dion Boucicolt, a 19th Century play about the
18th Century United Irishmen uprising

Dion > dionysus > death & resurrection > Finnegan in the ballad

nor avoice, page 3 > Nora's voice Grin

Hohohoho, Mister Finn, you're going to be Mister Finnagaon, para 6 Huh
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128  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: Benjamin Tucker on: September 07, 2005, 03:23:24 PM
Damme, i can't access that so-called webpage either  Cry Huh

JJ started as a Panellite and moved to Tuckeirite/Tolstoy
anarchism, but also supported early Sinn Fein [c 1920]
then uttered NO political opinons for the rest of his life...
er um except for one sarcastic putdown of Hitler
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129  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / swftly & sternly on: September 07, 2005, 03:12:38 PM
paragraph 1

Howth Castle > Swift a frequent visitor; Some claim an affair between him
and Lady St Lawrence > Lawrence Sterne

paragraph 2

Sir Tristram > Tristram Shandy by Lawrence Sterne

vanesoon > Esther van Homerrigh, another possible Swift amour, called
Vanessai in his poems

kidscad > Cadenus, one of Swift's pen names

issac > Isaac Beckersniff, another of Swift's pen names

vanessy > vanessa again

sosie sesthers > Fench sossie [twin] + German swesther [sisters]  / the 2 Esthers in
Swift's life [Vanesa + Esther Johhnson, whom he called Stella]
Note sterne = star in German, Stella = in star in Italian;
Joyce's glaucoma called die Sterne in german

paragraph 3

The fall > Swift had one of his dizzy spells and fell off his horse
in front of Howth Castle once

paragraph 5

swiftly ... sternly  > easy, eh?

JJ pointed out to Harriet Weaver that Sterne's style seems swift
and Swift's style seems stern


the Dean of St Patrick's before Swift another Sterne [not Lawrence]
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130  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: FW: Hostory and Resistance on: September 07, 2005, 10:22:22 AM
When very young [pre-1904  self-exile] JJ and Padraic Pearse
had an argument about thunder [English] and thurnuk [Gaelic
and which 'was' more poetic.
Look at the hundred-letter word representing thunder and
note how it ends



Just for fun, see how many other words for thunder you can
find in the 100 letters.... Grin
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131  Any and Everything / Group Space / HOUSING on: September 07, 2005, 09:09:13 AM
Set your search engine for Buckminster Fuller
or go to www.domehome.com

Fuller designed cheap mobile dwellings that anybody can erect in a day
[24 hous].
They can also get moved by helicopter from anywhere to
anywhere in a few days

Fuller also designed the Dew-line radar domes and over
300,000 large geodesic domes now standing.

Look into this and forward this message to anybody in the
govt. or the media who seems more interested in results
than in rhetoirc.


Most people are about as happy as they decide
to be.
   --Abraham Lincoln
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132  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / Re: FW: Hostory and Resistance on: September 07, 2005, 08:50:28 AM
Cashel cathedral also noteworthy because
Silken Thomas Fitzgerald burned it during
his rebellion. He later apologized, saying
"I sincerely regret my impetuous act that day.
but I swear to God I thought the bishop
was inside."
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133  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / zzplay the isomorphism game on: September 07, 2005, 08:27:22 AM
17 Kupris 80 p.s.U.

In my youth I majored in mathematics for a few years before switching to Education and then to Psychology. Out of this strange smorgasbord, I developed a lot of the surreal ideas in my books, and especially my weird habit of looking at art and myth in terms of isomorphisms ["similarities of structure"].

For instance, when I first saw Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind, I immediately saw an isomorphism with the Grail legend. Roy [Richard Dreyfus], the contactee most traumatized by his experience, seems like a fool to everybody -- especially to his wife. Parcifal also seems a fool, even "the perfect fool" in Wagner's version. Yet Roy gets past the government cover-up and enters the Mother Ship, and Parcifal passes through Chapel Perilous and finds the Holy Grail. Since Roy and Parcifal both have lots of companions or rivals on the Quest, one can even see an analog with the single sperm that beats all of its brothers and reaches the Egg first...

Close Encounters also has strong isomorphism to H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu;" but I leave that to the student's own ingenium, as Crowley would say.

Or consider the folktale, found from Russia across Europe to Ireland, in which a young girl on an errand of mercy meets a cannibal in the woods. The monster sets her three riddles, and when she solves them, instead of eating her he becomes her ally and defender. One variation on that became "Little Red Riding Hood" and another became The Silence of the Lambs.

The three brothers who go forth to slay the dragon in many fairy-tales appear as the three shark-hunters in Jaws; the Three Stooges trying to repair a plumbing system; the Englishman, the Welshman and the Scotsman, in many jokes of the British Isles; Smith, Jones and Robinson in logical puzzles [note the distinctly English, Welsh and Scot names]; Dumas' Three Muskateers; and all of these plus the three sons of Noah and the Holy Trinity in Finnegans Wake.

You might find some amusement in discovering the isomorphisms between Jesus' parable of the Good Samaratan, "The Little Engine That Could," and Ulysses; you might even glimpse why Joyce, who never used a word without intense awareness of its history, describes Bloom as behaving "in orthodox Samaratin fashion" in the first sentence of Book III.

Any number can play this game. Try finding the isomorphisms between the ancient ritual of bride-capture; the Eternal Triangle of Finn/Graunia/Dermot, Arthur/Guinevere/ Launcelot, Mark/Isolde/Tristan etc.; Zeus and Leda, Zeus and Danae, etc.; King Kong; Behind the Green Door; the rude man in the lower berth who interrupts the honeymoon couple in a 1001 bawdy jokes...

The more often you try this method, the more likely you will come to credit something like Jung's "collective unconscious" or Sheldrake's "morphogenetic field" and to suspect it has a structure both sexual and mathematical, like I Ching.
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134  Course Assignments / WEEK FOUR / epiphany & ideogram on: September 07, 2005, 08:22:49 AM
"Shit, motherfucker! I want my fucking money, motherfucker!"

Last night I looked at Spike Lee's superb film Jungle Fever on the Independent Film Channel and that line hurtled off the TV and burned into my neurons like a Joycean epiphany or a Poundian
ideogram.
The speaker, a minor character in the story, virtually a non-character, spoke into a cell-phone as the major character walked past him in a crowd scene, and yet he seemingly summed up everything about our world today.

Joyce developed his theory of the artistic epiphany from a similarly simple sentence that he overheard passing an open window in Dublin circa 1900. It seemed to him that with his usual mixture of logic, empathy and artistic intuition he "knew in a flash" a great many things about the speakers, their lives, the lives of most Dubliners, and, by extension, the lives of colonized peoples everywhere. I invite you to apply the same methods to the wonderful sentences Mr. Lee has given us:

"Shit, motherfucker! I want my fucking money, motherfucker!"

In the feudal age, people once fought wars over Land, when Land served as the source of wealth. Those who had Land wanted more, on the usual addictive rule that we want more of what makes us feel very very good. They also worried that others wanted to take their Land away. Then paper Money appeared, almost as abstract as pure information in communication theory. For over 400 years now, the world has struggled over Money -- working for it, swindling and robbing for it, conspiring to monopolize it, going to war over it. Since less than one percent of Earthians owns 99 percent of the Money, the [approximately] 6 billion of the rest of us struggle evermore desparately over the one percent of the green magick not yet monopolized. We all feel like Spike Lee's guy on the cell-phone part of the time,do we not?

Can you suggest some simillar ideograms from other recent souces? Cry Cry Angry
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135  Course Assignments / WEEK THREE / Re: structure and isomorphism on: September 03, 2005, 05:15:28 PM
17 Kupris 80 p.s.U.

In my youth I majored in mathematics for a few years before switching to Education and then to Psychology. Out of this strange smorgasbord, I developed a lot of the surreal ideas in my books, and especially my weird habit of looking at art and myth in terms of isomorphisms ["similarities of structure"].

For instance, when I first saw Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind, I immediately saw an isomorphism with the Grail legend. Roy [Richard Dreyfus], the contactee most traumatized by his experience, seems like a fool to everybody -- especially to his wife. Parcifal also seems a fool, even "the perfect fool" in Wagner's version. Yet Roy gets past the government cover-up and enters the Mother Ship, and Parcifal passes through Chapel Perilous and finds the Holy Grail. Since Roy and Parcifal both have lots of companions or rivals on the Quest, one can even see an analog with the single sperm that beats all of its brothers and reaches the Egg first...

Close Encounters also has strong isomorphism to H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu;" but I leave that to the student's own ingenium, as Crowley would say.

Or consider the folktale, found from Russia across Europe to Ireland, in which a young girl on an errand of mercy meets a cannibal in the woods. The monster sets her three riddles, and when she solves them, instead of eating her he becomes her ally and defender. One variation on that became "Little Red Riding Hood" and another became The Silence of the Lambs.

The three brothers who go forth to slay the dragon in many fairy-tales appear as the three shark-hunters in Jaws; the Three Stooges trying to repair a plumbing system; the Englishman, the Welshman and the Scotsman, in many jokes of the British Isles; Smith, Jones and Robinson in logical puzzles [note the distinctly English, Welsh and Scot names]; Dumas' Three Muskateers; and all of these plus the three sons of Noah and the Holy Trinity in Finnegans Wake.

You might find some amusement in discovering the isomorphisms between Jesus' parable of the Good Samaratan, "The Little Engine That Could," and Ulysses; you might even glimpse why Joyce, who never used a word without intense awareness of its history, describes Bloom as behaving "in orthodox Samaratin fashion" in the first sentence of Book III.

Any number can play this game. Try finding the isomorphisms between the ancient ritual of bride-capture; the Eternal Triangle of Finn/Graunia/Dermot, Arthur/Guinevere/ Launcelot, Mark/Isolde/Tristan etc.; Zeus and Leda, Zeus and Danae, etc.; King Kong; Behind the Green Door; the rude man in the lower berth who interrupts the honeymoon couple in a 1001 bawdy jokes...

The more often you try this method, the more likely you will come to credit something like Jung's "collective unconscious" or Sheldrake's "morphogenetic field" and to suspect it has a structure both sexual and mathematical, like I Ching.
Reply Reply with quote Notify of replies
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